Friday, May 12, 2017

Senator Stolen Valor

US Defense Watch ^ | May 11, 2017 | Ray Starmann 

Last night, on CNN, Senator Richard Blumenthal (D., CT) told Anderson Cooper that President Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey, “may well produce impeachment proceedings.”
Blumenthal continued: “It may well produce another United States vs. Nixon on a subpoena that went to United States Supreme Court.”
Senator Blumenthal is simply parroting more Democratic talking points that are full of sound and fury and which signify nothing.
There was no Saturday Night Massacre II. There were no violations of the law on the President’s part. There were no dictatorial machinations.
There was nothing except an adherence to proper procedures that were followed by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, appointed during the Obama administration, recommended to the President that Comey be terminated because of his blatant violations of his constitutional duties, his outright politicization of the FBI and because the men and women of the FBI had lost confidence in their director and believed he was nothing more than a corrupt, political hack.
Besides the fact that Blumenthal is just another liberal shill, his own ethical standards are anything but stainless. He has a closet stocked with enough skeletons to fill the haunted mansion at Disneyland.
In fact, the man is a complete scoundrel and a traitor to the veterans who fought, died and were wounded in the Vietnam War.
When speaking of who needs to be removed from public office, Blumenthal only needs to look in a mirror…
But, that would take a 2/3 Republican majority vote in the Senate and that isn’t happening soon.
For 30 years, Senator Blumenthal had been living a lie; a virtual Homeric tale with him as the hero serving with the Marine Corps in Vietnam until he was outed by the New York Times in 2010, during his Senatorial campaign.
The lies told by Blumenthal regarding his ‘Vietnam service’ are endless.
“We have learned something important since the days that I served in Vietnam,” Mr. Blumenthal said to the group gathered in March 2008. “And you exemplify it. Whatever we think about the war, whatever we call it — Afghanistan or Iraq — we owe our military men and women unconditional support.”
In 2003, he addressed a rally in Bridgeport, Connecticut, where about 100 military families gathered to express support for American troops overseas. “When we returned, we saw nothing like this,” Mr. Blumenthal said. “Let us do better by this generation of men and women.”
In at least eight newspaper articles published in Connecticut from 2003 to 2009, he is described as having served in Vietnam.
The New Haven Register on July 20, 2006, described him as “a veteran of the Vietnam War,” and on April 6, 2007, said that the attorney general had “served in the Marines in Vietnam.” On May 26, 2009, The Connecticut Post, a Bridgeport newspaper that is the state’s third-largest daily, described Mr. Blumenthal as “a Vietnam veteran.” The Shelton Weekly reported on May 23, 2008, that Mr. Blumenthal “was met with applause when he spoke about his experience as a Marine sergeant in Vietnam.”
And the idea that he served in Vietnam had become such an accepted part of his public biography that when a national outlet, Slate magazine, produced a profile of Mr. Blumenthal in 2000, it said he had “enlisted in the Marines rather than duck the Vietnam draft.”
In an interview, Jean Risley, the chairwoman of the Connecticut Vietnam Veterans Memorial Inc., recalled listening to an emotional Mr. Blumenthal offering remarks at the dedication of the memorial. She remembered him describing the indignities that he and other veterans faced when they returned from Vietnam.
“It was a sad moment,” she recalled. “He said, ‘When we came back, we were spat on; we couldn’t wear our uniforms.’ It looked like he was sad to me when he said it.”
Ms. Risley later telephoned the reporter to say she had checked into Mr. Blumenthal’s military background and learned that he had not, in fact, served in Vietnam.
In actuality, Blumenthal was given five, count ‘em five deferments to attend college from 1965 to 1970. The only place he ‘returned’ from was a sorority house. The only ‘coming home’ he did was when his mother picked him up at the t