Tuesday, June 6, 2017

James Roninson: Trump Has Potential To ‘Become One Of The Great Miracles The World Has Ever Seen’

Right Wing Watch ^ | June 2017 | By Kyle Mantyla | 

Televangelist James Robison, who has been a key spiritual advisor to Donald Trump, spoke at the Family Research Council’s “Watchmen on the Wall” conference last week, where he declared that President Donald Trump has the potential “to become one of the greatest miracles the world has ever seen.”
In Trump, Robison said, people can see “glimpses of the Father” and signs of God’s love for humanity.
Robison said that Trump is “captivated” by Jesus Christ, adding that in all his years of ministry, he has “have never been more openly received, I have never sown a seed faithfully, forcefully on more fertile ground” than with Trump.
“In 55 years of public ministry, I have never been received with more graciousness, gratitude, sincere appreciation and genuine meekness,” Robison said.
“The morning after the State of the Union address, I called him and I said, ‘Sir, last night we not only saw what your children say a good father is, we saw the Father. Several times we got glimpses of the Father … When you looked up at that widow and you loved her and you thanked her, the compassion of a loving, heavenly Father flowed through you, sir.'”
Robison said that he told Trump that “if you are receiving Jesus Christ like you have received me, you are going to become one of the greatest miracles the world has ever seen.”

In the face of Islam, thank God for Donald Trump!

https://www.onenewsnow.com/ ^ | June 5, 2017 | Bryan Fischer 

With three major terror attacks in three months, the Brits have had just about all they're going to take. On this side of the pond, Donald Trump – one of the few political leaders in the Western world who gets it – is getting dangerously stonewalled.

In the wake of Saturday's third Muslim Massacre in as many months in London, several observations come to mind. The attack killed seven and put 48 in the hospital, 21 of whom are in critical condition.
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The British are still in denial about the source of the problem. The problem is not Islamic extremism, the problem is Islam, and the UK's leaders just do not get it. Or if they do get it, which they well might, they won't admit it.
Prime Minister Theresa May did finally use the expression "Islamist extremism," for the first time to my knowledge, but continues to give Islam itself a total whitewash. She did say "enough is enough," and pledged to ramp up vigilance and patrols and so forth. But let's not forget she was in charge of the UK's homeland security since 2010, so all of this has happened on her watch. If the problem is cancer, you're not going to cure it by only treating the symptoms, and Ms. May is still in the denial stage regarding Islam and still in the band-aid and cough drop stage of trying to defeat jihad.
The Muslim mayor of London told us how outraged and appalled and furious he was, but he didn't sound very outraged, appalled, or furious. He, of course, is institutionally incapable of identifying Islam itself as the problem, which is the very problem we encounter in today's world when we place Muslims in political office.
UK authorities are now acknowledging how troubled they are that all these attacks appear to be random and impossible to predict. Yet they almost immediately arrested 12 people, which means one thing: they know who these people are. The only solution is to suspend Islamic immigration and start closing mosques to keep the problem from getting any worse than it is.
'It's Islam stupid!' signNigel Farage said over the weekend that the British people have had just about all they are going to take, and if something is not done, they are going to start insisting on the immediate detention of the 23,000 Muslims in the UK who have known terrorist ties.
Because it has no Second Amendment, Britain has left its citizens defenseless. The UK has made a concerted and systematic effort to disarm its own citizens, with the result that the Brits were forced to resort to throwing chairs and beer bottles at the invaders for their own protection. Bizarrely and incomprehensibly, 90 percent of Britain's cops are unarmed, a lethal vulnerability. One eyewitness, according to the London Guardian, observed unarmed police actually running away from the jihadis like everybody else who was utterly defenseless.
The UK police have developed what they believe is a brilliant strategy for conquering Islamic terror. It is "Run. Hide. Tell." Good grief. This is not the Britain that under Churchill stood fiercely and courageously alone against the Nazi menace for two years, and pledged to fight on the beaches, on the landing grounds, in the fields, in the streets, and in the hills and never surrender.
Kurt Schlichter, a columnist for Townhall, said America, thanks to our Constitution, has a different response to terrorists: instead of "Run. Hide. Tell" it's "Draw. Aim. Shoot." Let's all thank God for the Second Amendment and for the wisdom and foresight of the Founders who gave us the liberty to protect ourselves with something other than furniture.
And finally, thank God for Donald Trump. He seems to be the only political leader in the Western world outside of Farage and Geert Wilders of the Netherlands who gets it and is prepared to do something about it.
His proposed travel ban will be before the Supreme Court this week, as he appeals to the Court to allow the ban to go into effect while it is making its way through the courts. The ban on travel from jihadi hot spots around the world is perfectly legal and perfectly constitutional, and only politically driven activists masquerading as federal judges have blocked it.
If anything, the president's proposed ban is too small rather than too large. Trump's critics actually make this point when they argue that it won't help that much because it doesn't block jihadis from Pakistan or Saudi Arabia or Qatar. Fine. Let's enlarge the list. (An Australian senator, by the way, began calling over the weekend for the immediate suspension of all Muslim immigration to the Land Down Under.) Since we have no way of knowing which Muslim immigrants will be harmless and which ones will try to blow us up, we must be careful with them all.
The only prospect America has of pulling back from the abyss England is staring into right now is President Trump. If ever there was a time for us to "pray for all who are in high positions," as the Scriptures urge us to do (1 Timothy 2:2), now is it.

The Horrible Waste of War

Indiania Unviersity Press ^ | 06-16-1944 | Ernie Pyle 

NORMANDY BEACHHEAD, June 16, 1944 – I took a walk along the historic coast of Normandy in the country of France.

It was a lovely day for strolling along the seashore. Men were sleeping on the sand, some of them sleeping forever. Men were floating in the water, but they didn’t know they were in the water, for they were dead.

The water was full of squishy little jellyfish about the size of your hand. Millions of them. In the center each of them had a green design exactly like a four-leaf clover. The good-luck emblem. Sure. Hell yes.
I walked for a mile and a half along the water’s edge of our many-miled invasion beach. You wanted to walk slowly, for the detail on that beach was infinite.

The wreckage was vast and startling. The awful waste and destruction of war, even aside from the loss of human life, has always been one of its outstanding features to those who are in it. Anything and everything is expendable. And we did expend on our beachhead in Normandy during those first few hours.
*
For a mile out from the beach there were scores of tanks and trucks and boats that you could no longer see, for they were at the bottom of the water – swamped by overloading, or hit by shells, or sunk by mines. Most of their crews were lost.
You could see trucks tipped half over and swamped. You could see partly sunken barges, and the angled-up corners of jeeps, and small landing craft half submerged. And at low tide you could still see those vicious six-pronged iron snares that helped snag and wreck them.
On the beach itself, high and dry, were all kinds of wrecked vehicles. There were tanks that had only just made the beach before being knocked out. There were jeeps that had been burned to a dull gray. There were big derricks on caterpillar treads that didn’t quite make it. There were half-tracks carrying office equipment that had been made into a shambles by a single shell hit, their interiors still holding their useless equipage of smashed typewriters, telephones, office files.
There were LCT’s turned completely upside down, and lying on their backs, and how they got that way I don’t know. There were boats stacked on top of each other, their sides caved in, their suspension doors knocked off.
In this shoreline museum of carnage there were abandoned rolls of barbed wire and smashed bulldozers and big stacks of thrown-away lifebelts and piles of shells still waiting to be moved.
In the water floated empty life rafts and soldiers’ packs and ration boxes, and mysterious oranges.
On the beach lay snarled rolls of telephone wire and big rolls of steel matting and stacks of broken, rusting rifles.
On the beach lay, expended, sufficient men and mechanism for a small war. They were gone forever now. And yet we could afford it.
We could afford it because we were on, we had our toehold, and behind us there were such enormous replacements for this wreckage on the beach that you could hardly conceive of their sum total. Men and equipment were flowing from England in such a gigantic stream that it made the waste on the beachhead seem like nothing at all, really nothing at all.
*
A few hundred yards back on the beach is a high bluff. Up there we had a tent hospital, and a barbed-wire enclosure for prisoners of war. From up there you could see far up and down the beach, in a spectacular crow’s-nest view, and far out to sea.
And standing out there on the water beyond all this wreckage was the greatest armada man has ever seen. You simply could not believe the gigantic collection of ships that lay out there waiting to unload.
Looking from the bluff, it lay thick and clear to the far horizon of the sea and beyond, and it spread out to the sides and was miles wide. Its utter enormity would move the hardest man.
As I stood up there I noticed a group of freshly taken German prisoners standing nearby. They had not yet been put in the prison cage. They were just standing there, a couple of doughboys leisurely guarding them with tommy guns.
The prisoners too were looking out to sea – the same bit of sea that for months and years had been so safely empty before their gaze. Now they stood staring almost as if in a trance.
They didn’t say a word to each other. They didn’t need to. The expression on their faces was something forever unforgettable. In it was the final horrified acceptance of their doom.
If only all Germans could have had the rich experience of standing on the bluff and looking out across the water and seeing what their compatriots saw.

JUNE 6, 1944: THE GREATEST DAY OF THE 20TH CENTURY

US Defense Watch ^ | June 5, 2017 | Ray Starmann 

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world. I have full confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory! Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.
SIGNED: Dwight D. Eisenhower

For years, George refused to talk about it. Whenever I pressed him, I would be met with silence, or a brief outburst of nothing more than staccato words: bangalores, shingle, terror, dead men everywhere. George, you see, as a young US Army officer, landed on Omaha Beach during the famed D-Day invasion of Europe 73 years ago, on June 6, 1944.
The last time I saw him, on Christmas Day 1998, he looked at me with misty eyes, threw down the rest of his bourbon and said that D-Day will forever be remembered as the greatest day of the 20th century. George, like so many members of his generation, is no longer with us, but on this anniversary of Operation Overlord, his words resonate strongly. And so they should.
In the late spring of 1944, World War II was in its fifth year in Europe. The German Army had suffered defeats in North Africa, Sicily and in the battles of Stalingrad and Kursk in Russia. But, the formidable Wehrmacht still controlled Europe from the Russian steppes to the Norwegian fjords to the English Channel.
Several months before, in the autumn of 1943, Hitler had discerned that the main threat to Germany loomed not out of the East, but the West. In Fuehrer Directive Number 51, he proclaimed, “I can no longer justify the further weakening of the West in favor of other theaters of war. I have therefore decided to strengthen the defenses in the West.”
He appointed Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, The Desert Fox, to reconstruct the fortifications along the Atlantic Wall. Like the Fuehrer, Rommel believed that the invasion, when it came, could only be halted on the beaches. In just two years, the German Army had shifted from a blitzkrieg doctrine to a defensive posture hiding behind Rommel’s vaunted Festung Europa.
Despite around-the-clock Allied strategic bombing, Germany’s industry was producing arms and munitions at the highest capacity since the war began. Hitler’s insane fantasies of wonder weapons were becoming a reality as V-1 rockets, ME-262 jet fighters and the mammoth Tiger tank rolled off of German assembly lines.
In occupied Poland and Russia, the Nazis’ Final Solution (the complete genocide of European Jewry) was proceeding on schedule. Reichsfuehrer Heinrich Himmler had promised Hitler that by 1945 almost all of Europe’s Jews would be dead.
In Western Europe, millions of subjugated people, living in a nightmare world of starvation, deportation and summary execution awaited their resurrection from tyranny. They would not have much longer to wait.
At 1600 on June 5, 1944, General Dwight D. Eisenhower met once again at Southwick House with his key subordinates: Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, Gen. Omar Bradley, Air Marshal Arthur Tedder, Air Vice Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory, Adm. Bertram Ramsey, Maj. Gen. Kenneth Strong (SHAEF G-2) and RAF Group Capt. J.M. Stagg, his meteorologist. The night before, Stagg had predicted horrible weather conditions for the English Channel and the Normandy coastline. Ike had delayed the invasion for 24 hours. Now, Stagg’s forecast was more optimistic. The weather would clear, providing marginal conditions for up to 48 hours. After consulting with his commanders and staff and pausing to think on his own, Ike stared at his subordinates and said, “Okay, let’s go.”
Within an hour of Ike’s decision to go, the BBC began to broadcast its nightly “messages personnel” to the French Resistance. But, on this night, several of the messages were codes for the Maquis to begin sabotage operations. Two of them were: “Blessent mon Coeur d’une langeur monotone” (Wounds my heart with a monotonous languor) “Jean a une longe moustache.” (John has a long mustache.)
Those in the French Resistance knew that the hour of liberation was at hand. On the evening of June 5, 1944, the troops of the Allied Expeditionary Force quickly received word of Ike’s decision to go. Each man knew he bore a gigantic responsibility. The success of Operation Overlord would determine the freedom of a continent, and of the world for years to come.
The men of D-Day knew they could not fail. There was no substitute for victory. Winston Churchill knew the price of failure too. “If we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Churchill knew that with victory, “All Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands.”
Operation Overlord commenced at just after midnight on June 6. As British Glider troops secured Pegasus Bridge near Caen, the American airborne armada was on its way to the Cotentin Peninsula. The 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions had orders to secure the various causeways and roads connected to Utah and Omaha Beaches to the Normandy interior.
Within minutes of crossing the Normandy coastline, the vast air armada ran into thick clouds and intense anti-aircraft fire. Many of the 870 C-47s carrying both divisions separated from their “V-of-V” formations and became lost, with each plane flying seemingly blind toward the drop zones.
As the enemy fire intensified, disoriented pilots began to unload the airborne troops. In the dead of night, many of the paratroopers landed alone, miles from where they were supposed to be. Separated from their buddies, their officers, their platoons, even their divisions, the paratroopers nevertheless began to move out to their objectives. Some of them located other soldiers from their companies. Some fought with troopers from another division. Some fought alone.
As dawn broke on June 6, the Allied fleet opened-up on the German coastal defenses with naval gunfire and rockets. Under the impression that the bombardment had killed or wounded a large percentage of the German defenders, the troops of the 4th, 29th and 1st Infantry Divisions, and the 2nd and 5th Ranger Battalions, boarded Higgins landing craft.
Allied intelligence had claimed that the U.S. 29th and 1st Divisions would face the crippled German 716th Division – and only one battalion from that unit at that. Intelligence was dead wrong. Three battalions from the veteran 352th Infantry Division were dug in defending the area known as Omaha Beach.
Then a navigational error caused the 4th Infantry Division to land a mile south of its intended target. Utah Beach was lightly defended and became a quick success. Eyeing a tactical opportunity, Brig. Gen. Teddy Roosevelt Jr. ordered his commanders to “start the war from right here.”
By 0700, Omaha Beach had become a shambles. Gen. Bradley, who as commander of the 1st U.S. Army was responsible for the Utah and Omaha Beach landings, considered at one point pulling out of Omaha and shifting the incoming forces to Utah. Troops were pinned down at the water’s edge by intense machine gun fire. Zeroed mortars and 88s picked off disembarking soldiers like sitting ducks. But, still the men landed and attempted to move inland.
By noon, thousands of casualties littered Omaha Beach. Many soldiers huddled against the rocky shingle awaiting a certain fate. But others knew that they had to achieve a breakthrough. They had to get through the draws, climb the bluffs and destroy the machine gun nests and the pillbox crews.
One by one, junior officers and young sergeants inspired their men to get off the beach. Using Bangalore explosives, they blew obstacles and opened narrow gaps in the barriers. As the men moved inland, they set off numerous anti-personnel mines. Paths of dead and wounded men marked trails to follow.
By late afternoon, the U.S. forces had finally secured Omaha Beach. Across the Allied front, forces were gaining a small foothold in Normandy. D-Day succeeded not because of a brilliant plan, not because of special intelligence, and not because of technology. D-Day succeeded because of the ingenuity of 18-year-old-privates, the bravery of 22-year-old junior officers and the innovation of their commanders. D-Day succeeded because everyone knew the stakes at hand. They knew that to live in a world conquered by the Nazis was not an option.
What if the men of D-Day had failed?
It would have taken the Allies perhaps another year to launch a second cross-channel invasion. By that time, the Germans would have been equipped with thousands of their new jets. The V-1 and V-2 rockets would have wreaked extreme havoc on London and Southern England. The Final Solution would probably have been completed. German scientists, although behind the Allies in the race for the atomic bomb, may have gained precious time to create their own device.
Worst of all, Adolf Hitler would have continued to walk this earth.
In 1964, on the 20th anniversary of D-Day, CBS newsman Walter Cronkite – who as a young UPI reporter had landed behind enemy lines that night in a troop-carrying glider – interviewed Eisenhower on Omaha Beach. Gazing at the coastline, the former allied commander and retired president recalled why that mammoth invasion was different from famous battles in ancient history:
“It’s a wonderful thing what those fellows were fighting for and sacrificing for, what they did to preserve our way of life. Not to conquer any territory, not for ambitions of our own. But to make sure that Hitler could not destroy freedom in the world. I think it’s just overwhelming. To think of the lives that were given for that principle, paying a terrible price on this beach alone. But, they did it so the world could be free. It just shows what free men will do rather than be slaves.”
Perhaps correspondent Ernie Pyle most eloquently expressed what we owe these men today, more than seven decades later. In a column, written on June 12, 1944, Pyle said: “I want to tell you what the opening of the second front entailed, so that you can know and appreciate and forever be humbly grateful to those both dead and alive who did it for you.”
The glory of D-Day will never die.

Screw Up

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RECUSAL?

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Within a decade!

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Special Libtard

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OH REALLY?

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Common Sense?

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Climate Change

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Black Conservatives

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TRUST!

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de Macron

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Outlaw War?

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STFU!

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Your Answer!

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