Sunday, December 18, 2016

What jury duty with Secretary of State nominee Rex Tillerson was like

World Tribune ^ | December 14, 2016 | Emily Roden 

“Nine years ago, I showed up to the Denton County Courthouse for jury duty and got myself picked for the job. A young girl had accused her mom’s boyfriend of sexual assault and the case was being brought to trial. If you’ve ever served on a jury trial before, you understand the almost immediate, yet very temporary bond that ties 12 strangers together who are randomly chosen from each of their private lives in order to fulfill a very solemn public purpose.
One of our first tasks was to choose our jury foreman. Perhaps it was his business suit, his impressive stature, or his charisma, but almost everyone in that jury room suggested that this middle-aged man with greying hair was likely the most fit for the task.
‘Thanks, but I decline. I’m not interested in the spotlight,’ he told us. I didn’t think anything of it.
I had just bought my first BlackBerry and used my breaks to catch up on all the emails I was missing from my week at the courthouse. I recall leaving the jury room on a break with this man and remarking how busy I was and how much work I had to do. He smiled as he sat and read the paper.
From the first day of jury selection, we all noticed another suited man always present in the courtroom. His presence was intriguing due to the ear piece in his ear. While grabbing lunch at Denton County Independent Hamburger on the square the 2nd day of the trial, we noticed this mysterious man dining with our fellow juror who declined the foreman spot. The intrigue grew and it was the talk of the jury – who were these men?
Finally, during a break in the jury room, one juror had the nerve to ask; ‘Who are you? And what do you do?’
Our fellow jury member was reading the paper again and pointed out an article with Exxon in the headlines.
‘I work for them,’ he said humbly. ‘There are a lot of people in this world who hate me for what I do, so they give me and my family guys like that to protect me.’
I immediately felt embarrassed for complaining to him the other day about how much work I had to do. It didn’t take long before a few internet searches revealed that I was serving on this jury with the CEO of Exxon Mobile, Rex Tillerson.
The trial concluded and it was time for the jury to deliberate. The story was heartbreaking and the facts of the case were clear enough to make the majority of the jury convinced of the guilt of this sexual offender of a little girl. But the defense did a good enough job to create a couple of hold-outs. As our deliberations came to a close, it appeared we might have a hung jury.
That’s when Mr. Tillerson began to speak. Humbly, delicately, and without an ounce of condescension toward those who disagreed, he began walking us all through the details of the case. I even recall being moved by his thorough explanation about the nature of doubt and the standards set forth by our justice system. With great patience, this man who strikes multi-billion dollar deals with foreign heads of state brought our scrappy jury together to bring a sexual predator to justice and to deliver justice for a scared and deeply wounded little girl.
A local nonprofit was instrumental in fostering that young girl through this process, providing her counseling and legal help. I was so struck by their mission that I toured their facility the week following the case in order to learn how I could donate and volunteer to their cause.
On a whim, I decided to reach out to Mr. Tillerson to encourage him to do the same. I found an email for him online and sent him a note, touting the role this agency played in our trial and urging him to consider supporting the great work that they do. To my surprise, I received an email back thanking me for my note, my jury service, and ensuring me that he would contact the agency. I later received a call from the director of that nonprofit to let me know that Mr. Tillerson followed-through and gave a generous donation.
I didn’t vote for Trump. This is not an endorsement of Mr. Tillerson for Secretary of State. I’m sure that the coming days and weeks will be filled with speculation and political discussion over this clearly controversial pick for Secretary of State. I certainly appreciate those concerns and the process that ensures significant scrutiny for this important position.
But during a news show tonight, I heard the term ‘corrupt’ applied to this man who I spent five days with back in 2007.
All I know is that this man holds one of the most powerful positions in the world and clearly has the means and ability to side step his jury responsibilities, served as a normal citizen without complaint or pretense. I know that a scared little girl who was finally convinced to come public with her account of abuse was inches away from a decision that would have sided with her abuser, yet this man put his negotiation skills to a very noble use and justice was served. All I know is that this man and his myriad of aides could have ignored an unsolicited email from a girl in her 20s suggesting that he donate to a local cause, but he took the time to respond and opened up his pocket book.
My five days with Rex Tillerson is all I know about this man and his character. And in light of the recent news, I thought this a relevant story to tell.”

Rabble-rousing activists finally run out of Taxpayers’ Money

Canada Free Press ^ | 12/18/16 | Judi McLeod 

It my have taken eight long years, but the days of high-handed, high-spending activists squatting on the White House are over. The business of ‘Making America Great Again’ is already in full swing.

Monumentally mouthy Michelle Obama should ditch the pious act in claiming that the election of Donald J. Trump leaves America in a sorry state of “hopelessness”. Like some of her tacky outfits it doesn’t look good on her.

Here she is in the closing act of her last holiday on American taxpayers taking advantage of an Oprah she once tried to drive out the White House to sanctimoniously tell the world how hopeless life will be without the overbearing presence of the America-hating Obamas.

Black Republican father-daughter electors will vote with pride: ‘I make no apologies’!

Bizpac Review and Fortune ^ | December 18, 2016 | Samantha Chang 

A black Republican father-daughter duo will make history when they cast their electoral votes for Donald Trump on Monday.
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Despite being barraged with emails, letters, postcards and phone calls urging them to change their electoral vote to Hillary Clinton, Mitchell and Hatter will vote for Trump, who won the state of Michigan.
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Both Kelly Mitchell and Henry Hatter have met Trump and are HOPEFUL and confident he will do great things. “Despite his imperfections (people) will find that his policies will benefit the majority of Americans,” Kelly said.

Her dad agreed. “People are always listening for a knock in the engine instead of how smoothly the engine runs,” said Hatter, 80.
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Michael Banerian, a 22-year-old elector from Michigan, has received countless death threats urging him to cast his vote for Clinton or his “brains will be blown out.”

Nasty, ominous letters and emails read: “You’re a hateful bigot, I hope you die,” Banerian said.

Is this what Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton meant when they said: “When they go low, we go high”?
(Excerpt) Read more at bizpacreview.com ...